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an extension of the debt ceiling, raised the debt ceiling for the future. and i didn't vote for that. there were no cuts included in that bill. the only cut that we have ever come up with is this 1.2 trillion, because the committee, the special select committee couldn't come up with a spending reductions, were now going to have as part as sequestration. i don't really believe in across the board cuts. i think that's irresponsible. but in the absence of cutting spending someplace to replace those 1.2 -- >> got to take it where you get it. >> it's not the only way we're going to get it. >> it's never a good time to cut spending. it's one of the things i've learned. i guess i saw it years ago when i worked down there. but reporting on this thing night after night, one of the things i learned, senator moran, is it's never a good time to cut spending. so march 1st is an interesting deadline. >> i'm not voting to set the sequester aside unless we cut the 1.2 trillion someplace else. >> good luck on that. senator jerry moran of kansas, thank you very much, sir. we appreciate it. >> thank yo
into further deficit and debt. >> obviously democrats would prefer a longer suspension of he debt ceiling which would provide additional economic security and stability as we continue to find ways to decrease the deficit. raising the possibility that the u.s. could default its obligations every few months is not an ideal way to run government but a short term solution is better than another imminent manufactured crisis. >> holman: the house already passed the bill. without it, the government would default on its obligations as early as mid-february. in economic news, americans' personal income grew in december, by the most in eight years. but first-time claims for jobless benefits were up last week. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average lost nearly 50 points to close at 13,860. the nasdaq fell a fraction of a point to close at 3,142. blinding snowfall and a slick freeway triggered a mile-long series of crashes in detroit today. at least three people were killed and 20 more injured. the pileups left a section of interstate 75 littered with wrecked cars and big-rig trucks. th
spending reforms in areas like debt. extension of the debt ceiling for two years. clarification on europe. first, the recession needs to stabilize, but beyond that, policy initiatives clearly indicate a road to political and fiscal and banking reforms and an indication that europe is serious about improving competitiveness. resumption of growth in emerging economies, like china, and finally the federal successfully engineering a modest increase in interest rates without unleashing runaway inflation. maria, these are tall orders, i know, but resolution of all these issues would be a huge boost to business confidence, capital expenditures and hiring would increase dramatically and revenues would rise, and that's what we need, maria. back to you. >> that's some list, bob. >> pretty ambitious. >> we'll be watching that. not everybody is buying into this bull market theory, by the way. pimco's bill gross is actually warning investors to be afraid, and i mean very afraid, of how inflation and the flood of cheap money will impact investments from here on out. bill joins me exclusively from pimco
something on sequester or the sky will fall. we have to do something on the debt ceiling or the sky will fall. we have to do something on the continuing resolution or government will shut down and the sky will fall. where do you draw the line? we have a $16 trillion debt in this country. we've got to take a stand. >> howard dean, let me go to you on this because actually you're a tight fisted guy. if i understand it, you want the sequester to go nthrough. $85 billion this year. a little less than 2.5% of the $3.8 trillion budget. if you take out entitlements, then it becomes about a 6%, 7% or 8% cut. what's wrong with that? we're in trouble. doct why can't we do it? >> the sky will fall if you don't deal with the debt ceiling. but i think unfortunately, this is the price that we pay in the fiscal cliff deal. the democrats paid. i said at the time that i thought it was a short term victory for the democrats, but a long term victory for the republicans because we gave away our leverage on tax increases. so, sure, i have no objection to giving away the carried interest on some of the p
. >> nobody is worried about this upcoming debate on sequestration, on the debt ceiling. you think that creates noise and disruption. >> i do, maria. i think that you've got a trifecta coming off, you've got the skywest raise and the debt ceiling and the eurozone so there's still a lot of volatility out there, so that's have we're cautiously optimistic. you need to be properly allocated in order to reap the rewards of the greatest capital machine in the world which is our united states stock market. >> thanks, everybody. appreciate your time. >> we'll see you soon in the final stretch of trading. we've got a market that's higher on the dow jones industrial average. >> remember, the dow needs to be up 66 points or there abouts to be positive. don't look now but suddenly apple is up past $475 a share and it's all because big investors have a beef with the board. we'll talk to one major investor who is on apple's side in this battle. >> look outside new york city and our cnbc headquarters. it is bad and it's getting worse. the big worry now, power outages. believe it or not, there we
over the budget. republicans acted in that direction by putting off the debt ceiling a couple of months until may as hampton mentioned a minute ago. the president is going to propose the same thing on the budget sequester but not, according to a white house official, laying out his own plan. he's going to call on congress to do that and expected response from republicans, tyler, is, hey, mr. president, where are your cuts, we want to see them. >> john harwood, thank you very much. once again you will see the president's address live right here on "power lunch" in just a few moments. before that occurs, we have a triple digit advance. the market added to advances a few moments ago when we got budget figures. the dow up 109 points. the nasdaq up 34 and the s&p 500 is up 14 points. more on the trading action right here from bob pisani. he joins me on the floor of the nyse. it's almost like yesterday didn't happen. >> the important thing is, i know it doesn't seem terribly exciting but we are 14,000, we're a couple of points from a historic high from the dow jones industrial. we've been up
final approval today to a measure that would at least put off the debate over raising the debt ceiling. this measure suspends the government's borrowing limit to may 19th. the national debt will be pushing $17 trillion. in other words, it's really washington's version of kicking the can down the road. the president is expected to sign this bill immediately. >>> now to the economy and the financial markets. stocks fell a bit today with all three major indexes modestly lower. but for the month, the dow was up almost 6%, the best since january in '94. nasdaq gained 4%, s&p just over 6. its best january since '97. what is the market surge trying to tell us when mixed in with some bad news out there, as well? and on the eve of another big jobs report? our report from nbc's tom costello. >> reporter: 25-year-old kory wilson can tell you, it's not easy looking for a job. she has applied for 200 since earning a master's degree in public relations last may. >> being a post graduate, either i'm overqualified or i'm underqualified. >> she is looking for work, but the economy seemingly poised to e
, a major funding bill expires. the debt ceiling fight will resurface in the summer. >>> new polls showing the nra's opposition to reforming certain gun laws isn't registering with the american public. according to polling, more than 90% of voters in three states say they support wider background checks for people buying weapons at gun shows. that includes voters who live in households with a gun. when it comes to the question of armed police in schools, more voters in virginia, new jersey, and pennsylvania support the idea than oppose it. the board of education in new it is town, connecticut, is requesting funding for armed police officers in four elementary schools for the next school year. in chicago, meanwhile, mayor rahm emanuel is moving 200 officers from desk duty to the streets amid the city's most violent months in decades. 42 people have been murdered this year including 15-year-old who was shot dead this week while hanging out with friends in a park. >> when any young person in our city is gunned down without reason, their death makes an impression on all of us. and it demands a
for biotechnology, information and analysis, "biocentury this week." >>> congress has postponed the debt ceiling crisis. now the focus in washington has swung back to budgets and deficits. the nation is heading toward budget sequestration. for medicare this means a 2% spending cut. but that's just a downpayment. any serious attempt to tackle the deficit must curb the increase in medicare and medicaid spending. last week a kaiser family foundation report listed 150 ideas to reduce medicare spending. the problem is almost all of
spending, and essentially postponed some of the other issues, like the debt ceiling, which was going to come up very quickly in the new year, and now has been postponed to may 19. we also have a sequestration but was postponed for two months and that's coming back at the end of february. and if that wasn't enough we have a c.r., since we don't pass budgeting now, we governed by c.r. we have a continuing resolution debate and vote coming up on or before the 27th of march. so what we have done is we've spread these crises out over the course of the whole first half of the year and that's going to be difficult for the economy to manipulate, because as we start istartto see fundamental improvt elsewhere, we will see continued refocusing on the inability of our government to come to terms with its spending, it's taxes, and its debt and deficit. and that will continually, i believe, while markets and call into question some of the more optimistioptimisti c factors that we are seeing. i'd like to call the panel up here, and we will start going through with we're going to do john first, and
to bring you back for this. quick thought about this, can we get rid of the debt ceiling? >> iveng what we're seeing is some of the political brinksman ship around the debt ceiling may be a thing of the past. the renls certainly got hurt politically trying to use that tool as leverage. 6/hopefully it's an indication that that particular kind of brinksman ship is behind us. >> we'll see. i never put it beyond politicians. when the story changes, they'll change. julie, now win promise you can have your coffee break or tea break. try tea, it's very nice. english breakfast. very good thing to have first thing in the morning. we'll come back to you, jules, julia. >>> in the united states, in addition to the jobs report, there are some other pieces of the economic data. the final look at january consumer sentiment is out at 9:55 a.m. eastern. on the corporate front, exxon mobil, chevron, merck, tyson foods all report earnings before the bell. january sales are also out. they're expected to be seen at the strong rate compared to last year. this is all thanks to pent up demand as well as the impro
is under 2 percent growth. you know, if we don't resolve some of the debt ceiling and some of the spending cuts and get into some of the fiscal order that you were talking about, you're going to have that weight on it, and even though you proposed a lot of hope with japan in terms of some of the political leadership, they are still in negative growth was 7%. so now your up to 50% or so of world gdp that is a drag on the economy. how you look at, you know, the broader sense of contagion as it relates to the emerging market growth and development country growth with 50 percent of world's gdp possibly in that situation? >> i think the trade figure still at all, whether you agree with the figures of growth are not, i think the trade figures show what is happening. there is no doubt, picking one of the countries mentioned, china, i mean, china for the last of the years has been double digit growth. last year they had one of the worst years in recent memory. we will see the final figures coming out. it did not give below 7%, which i view as hard landing, but when you move from double digits down
. i think they will do the same thing on the upcoming debt ceiling and sequestration. ashley: so if we do have this pullback after the state of the union, jeff, what sectors or stocks in particular do you like? >> i actually like all the sectors except the consumer staples. a lot of portfolio managers, professional money has been hiding out in the consumer staples because they were worried about the upcoming election, the fiscal cliff, the debt ceiling, china slowing, you name it, dysfunctional government. now it has become more apparent our dysfunctional government has become a little bit less dysfunctional i think investors will start to have to look at the fundamentals. i think the fundamentals with the housing situation, the automobile strength i think it is going to come to the fore. tracy: i hope you're right, jeff saut, with raymond james. thank you very much, sir. >> you bet. ashley: jeff says when housing is healthy and automobile industry is healthy that's always a good sign for a solid recovery. tracy: he is not wrong, right? they do kumbaya at the last minute. ashley: good
the debt ceiling in may. president obama will sign the measure so the government can keep borrowing and paying the bills for a few more months. >>> gas prices rising more than usual this year. trip 8a reported $3.42. and in january, $3.32, second only to last year's january average! >> the party is on hold. and the feds say they're opposed to the marriage of the world's two biggest beer companies. on one side, anhauser busch. and the makers of an still. they have plan to buy popular mexican beers, including the top selling import, corona. but they filed a lawsuit, arguing that merger would give just one firm control of half of the u.s. beer market, and the competition could drive up prices wherever they buy the stuff. aanhauser busch will fight it in court. >>> facebook users can send a gift card to their friends by mail, but you continue use the facebook card to have purchase anything on the website itself. rather, it's meant for other places like target. it's available on the online gift store, which hasn't made any money. >>> a courtroom with three people inside, the man, his mo
up through april is the debt ceiling and what congress is going to do about that. and particularly, one number that was interesting this week was personal income and spending. it was a great number, but when you look forward, my concern is the new tax policies that are in place. and that amount of money may not be in consumers' pockets going forward. so it's been a great rally here in january. but i look for a pullback and i think we could see a 5% pullback when you look at interest rates hovering around 200 basis points, can't really pop any higher than that from a yield standpoint. i agree a correction is in the air and it is something we have to take a little pause, see where we're at and where we may go going forward. liz: yeah, i mean, we can't ignore the fact -- i want to check it because it changes moment by moment -- but the vix just at 13, straddling there? i mean alan you are looking at an energy and commodities picture over there. but when there is very little fear, and rising stocks, rising commodities, and a falling volatility index that just looks -- i mean we're show
how quiet things have become about what a huge story we had a month ago? what fiscal cliff? what debt ceiling? it looks like someone in washington is doing a big messaging switcheroo. they don't want us talking about how badly they have mismanaged our nation's finances. instead, let's get people talking about something that is also important, freedom, freedom to bear arms, freedom for people to travel to and from our country. well, the president can pretend he is a big skeet shooter, but it is insulting to think you will notice your paycheck has shrunk as a first of the year. melissa: and be sure to watch the tom sullivan show this weekend at seven and 10:00 p.m. on saturday and on sunday at 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. eastern. what do you think of the market? 14,000, up next week, the dow? >> we are rich. okay. i think it will bring people into the market. probably good. chase the market up as the money comes in. melissa: absolutely. all right. have a great weekend everybody. we'll see you back here monday. ♪ gerri: hello, everybody. i'm gerri willis. tonight on "the willis report" it'
merit. president obama has signed a debt ceiling suspension into law. the measure allows the government to keep borrowing to pay its bills. it puts off the next congressional battle over the debt ceiling until may. boeing is asking the faa for permission to resume test flights of its grounded 787 jet. it wants to test the batteries and other components in flight since certain conditions can't be simulated on the ground. the faa is evaluating boeing's request. >>> in wall street 2013 rally interrupted with a major averages suffering their worst one-day loss in a year on monday's trading. the last hour we spoke to goldman's jim o'neil about the prospects of making money in this market. >> i think to sell if you're a medium term player is probably not a smart move. but if you've made all the gains, to take some off the table isn't a crazy idea either. >> joining us now is nouriel roubini, chairman and co-founder of roubini global economics. you're not like a market master, maybe like a market jedi. plus andrew still here from fortune magazine. the one and only. we haven't seen you in a lon
, but after the break top republicans m house and senate part way on a key debt ceiling bill. will the intraparty scism end in heartburn or heart break? for over 75 years people have saved money with...ohhh... ...with geico... ohhh...sorry! director's voice: here we go. from the top. and action for over 75 years people have saved money with gecko so.... director's voice: cut it! ...what...what did i say? gecko? i said gecko? aw... for over 75 year...(laughs. but still trying to keep it contained) director's voice: keep it together. i'm good. i'm good. for over 75...(uncontrollable lahtuger). what are you doing there? stop making me laugh. vo: geico. saving people money for over seventy-five years. gecko: don't look at me. don't look at me. >>> the republican party is engaged in a fierce game of tug-of-war with itself. last week after speaker john boehner pleaded with his party to vote for a bill to extend the debt limit for three months, 33 members broke rank. the measure would have failed without democratic support. yesterday the senate took up that same bill and even though
, you've got the sequester, right, coming up march 1st, kicked the can a bit on raising the debt ceiling. >> want to watch the four ps, production, politics, profits, along as profit numbers come through, the market can lift. the personal income, the jobs number and the production is the industrial expansion. this last quarter was low, but mine us 0.1% because of defense reduction. other parts of the economy are doing well, especially the consumer. >> let's talk about what took us here. bank of america doing very well, verizon, at&t. you had the financials and the telecom stocks as the leadership groups. merck was down 2%. exxon down. three dow stocks were actually down. what happened there and what are you seeing at the end of the kay? >> finally seeing the laggards catching up and telecoms have done okay during this period, but i think what uruguay seeing is the overall economic data with the exception of the weaker gkp number. all the other data was very strong and all the companies are pulling up with that. >> and then with that, swing it around, what happened there. dts. what happen
're not worried about the china hard landing. we're not worried about the debt ceiling crisis. we're not worried about, well, for the moment, the eu -- we have that kind of psychological factor. a healthy private sector. and the problem is what? the problem is government and bad policy. and that's what we have to offset. >> but jim iuorio, i want to know where to invest. do we buy gold, silver, and commodities? do we buy banks, which are lagging a little bit? do we buy industrial cyclicals to play the world boom, if there is such a thing? in other words, how do you invest right now, having passed this 14,000 benchmark? >> well, there's a couple things. first of all, when caterpillar released its earnings it talked about good numbers out of housing. and you stloe in china. you invest in things like copper. you know i still like gold and silver. and today with the green light from the fed i'm still going to stay in things like those. i am in bank of america. i am in health care. i think the stock market looks pretty good. you said before, though, the stock market tends to be a leading indicator of
to delay having to debate raising the debt ceiling? >> well, it was a decision by house republican leaders a few weeks ago. they tried in 2011 to use the debt limit as a lynch -- leverage point to force obama to swallow spending u cuts. it worked but -- [inaudible] to something like 9%. and they recognize that it was a bad idea. i mean, gambling with the credit of the united it turned out is a bad idea. we were downgraded for the first time in nation's history. they department want to do that again. like i said, i didn't want to vote for a bigger national debt either. that doesn't fit with their philosophy. they came up with the strategy of saying we're going us is fend. and in the meantime, they want the senate to pass a budget for 2014 and the law salses that -- says that if either chamber fails to adopt a budget by april 15, the paychecks will be docked. the idea of the thing is to postpone the sort of economy raddling default situation until they can prosecute the continuing fight over taxes and spending to a point where, you know, both are satisfied and the debt limit can be raised ag
the regulatory environment out there and how healthcare will affect them. the debt ceiling continues to go up and the overall debt. they are very concerned about all of those things. lori: do you think washington has the best interests of small business at heart? >> well, i hope so. the unfortunate part is we are seeing it in the administration. it continues to attack small business. washington has a spending problem, not a revenue problem. we hear about this every single week. lori: you point out that many small businesses do not have lawyers or lobbyists that focus on this. the list goes on and on. that is a serious problem. a serious disadvantage for them, correct? >> exactly. they do not have the resources. that is one of the reasons why we are trying to provide the voice for small businesses. we need to be the advocate for small businesses here in washington. lori: you look at our ballooning national debt in the battle over the current deficit. what is the best outcome? >> that would be for the federal government to reduce spending. that is just all there is to it. lori: where exactly? i
president has ever had -- what president has ever had the hostage-taking of the debt ceiling so you can't write a budget if there are individuals in the congress that won't do the normal business which is to raise the debt ceiling so that the american people can be taken care of? as we speak, however, the president has introduced today a short-term fix to avert the sequester. the democrats have offered a way of avoiding the sequester. we have nothing from the republicans except a resolution that says a request for a plan. the very plan that the president knows by law he's going to submit as long as he knows what is the amount of money we have to work on and of course the budgeting process is going through the house, the chairman of the budget, mr. ryan, the ranking member of the budget, mr. van hollen. we all know the regular order. we are going to do our work. but putting us on the floor today and ignoring what we should be doing, i'm saddened that my amendment that indicated i wanted to make sure that the most vull vulnerable in any budget, -- vulnerable in any budget, 21% of our nati
. there was an agreement made a year-and-a-half ago that he would get a debt ceiling increase and there would be a $1.20 trillion cut. the super committee was supposed to put it together. they were supposed to prioritize. they were selects members of the congress who were supposed to prioritize. they did not do it. know when they might not do it, congress said we will put something in here that is so draconian and so stupid that nobody would let it happen. lo and behold, that is what we are dealing with. that is a sad state of affairs from the political process, a very sad state of affairs. now we come back and say, what should we do with sequestration? the president talks about cows balance and fairness. -- talks about balance and fairness. there was $4 in spending for every $1 in tax increases. as we went along, the discussion shifted. as election prospects rose and fell, the balance suddenly became $2 to $1. after the election, the talk was $1 to $1. after we saw the deal done, it was zero spending cuts for the tax increases. now we are hearing negative to $1. the president wants to counsel becaus
important that house republicans made the move for a short-term compromise on the debt ceiling. that's good news for markets because it shows politicians are not going to play chicken with the one thing that could really make a difference to the u.s. economy. it does suggest, though, that both the sequester and the continuing resolution might be places where opposition republicans take the opportunity to try to extract some containment trt white house. >> and what's your -- as you've priced that in, what do you expect, actually, the to be the outcome as we head into march towards the end of the month? is there more fiscal drag related tr these talks? >> we still see economic up sides for the u.s. citi economists have improved their growth forecast overall, but this isn't helping and it's not necessarily helping business confidence. what we think markets may not be prepared for is the fact that ee quest ragz is now likely to kick in. these are comments from both parties suggested that they be willing to allow this to happen. it may be the lesser of the evils. >> what are we talking about wit
of the debt ceiling vote to do wait has not done in the last four years and that is present a budget resolution for four years the senate said we don't care if the law requires us to do it. we'll ignore that. martha: let's hope dave camp's proposal of taking on tax reform is something republicans have been talking about for a long time. chinned with the fact that the senate must act on a budget must get us into tangibles in terms of this discuss in washington. carl, thank you so much. always good to talk to you. gregg: disturbing information about iran's nuclear program. martha: this is one of the most interesting moments of the game. the light went out. i thought this was a blowout game and the next thing you know -- a firsthand account from what it was like at the stadium from a familiar football fan. hey, it's me, progressive insurance. you know, from our 4,000 television commercials. yep, there i am with flo. hoo-hoo! watch it! [chuckles] anyhoo, 3 million people switched to me last year, saving an average of $475. [sigh] it feels good to help people save... with great discounts
had earmarked for the equity market. we have avoided the fiscal cliff posted on the debt ceiling. earnings are decent, decent economic indicators here and outside the u.s. on balance is good, not everyone of them. we have central bankers all over the world, but begging for reflation putting money in the system and a lot of cash getting zero return and those things i think are the reason the stock is likely to continue going. connell: that is the last one i want to pick up on because reading your most recent numbers is lack of tolerance for the cash balances giving a zero return, so people do look and say i can't get a return for a decent yield on anything, so i would rather be in stocks than any kind of fixed income class. if any of that changing in the future, and if so at what point? interest rates have to go up some point, don't they? >> i think they will continue to creep higher, but they can't go a lot higher because the economy would then weekend. so i think as we globalize and the rate race will continue hig, but a lot of cash out there saying when things were volatile in
, a strong first half of the year, and something happened, usually out of washington, s&p downgrade, debt ceiling debate, take the pick, and we fell off the cliff. do you see that happening this year? >> after the election in germany this fall, yes, i expect things will be bad in the world economy. cheryl: you mentioned europe four times now. >> yeah, i mean, there's going to be a lot of good news, and she's got one of the largest economies in the world. her central bank in europe is printing money as well now. everybody's printing money. cheryl, it can't go on. it's artificial. it's a pool of par dies. if it's based on printing presses, that's a bad theme. cheryl: the lost decade. gym -- jim rogers, thank you very much. congratulations on the book. >> thank youings thank you, make that two lost decades. cheryl: that's right, thank you. dennis: the dow is now at 13999, but they will be right some day. all right, looks like the housing recovery could be for real. december home prices making the highest leap in six and a half years, this as a third of listings in some markets, washington, d
it sounds like to me but i'm not certain. >> that's a good answer. >> your thoughts on the debt ceiling. >> no. >> you think we are in danger of a bond bubble? >> i don't even know what that is. >> which mario has done a better job monti or draghi? >> monti or draghi? you know i have no idea what you're talking about, so -- >> what's your favorite show on television? >> hmm. "american greed." >> really? >> yeah. >> can you open that up for me? >> oh! >> you just made my day. >> i wish we could show more of that stuff. that was michael james, guys. and he was touched. because he tweets about "american greed" all the time. and i went on to talk to him about his favorite show and he's like god forgive me, but the one when the preacher steals from the church, and he went through this whole thing about how that's his favorite show. matt burke went to harvard he knows his stuff with the ravens and the kicker for the niners, he's a cramer guy and he's a conservative aaa-rated tax-free bond guy. >> i feel so bad for these guys because it's kind of like talking to me about football. if you ask m
overseas. your push right now is getting it back home. >> with the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling and trying to get bipartisan, but over here is something called poverty, 50 million americans and racial disparity and cities collapsing and the like. i'm going to make the case we should build america an urban infrastructural bank for the purpose of long-term loans. we do it in europe and japan. and no other country charges people to repatriate their money once they pay taxes in that country. but we do. but if we, in fact, took a portion of that money, part for research and development and part of it for an institutional bank, you could do what banks are not doing, and that's invest in these downtrodden areas of our country. >> gillian, we've been talking about it for years, trillions of dollars sitting on the sidelines not coming back to america. how do we get it back here? >> almost $2 trillion. you've got average household earnings down over the past four years, poverty is up. we need this money working in our economy. how do we get it here? >> absolutely. i think the reverend's idea is very
. they really don't take into consideration the fact that we had the debt ceiling deal which was all cuts. that means they'll probably hold out for something that has cuts only. democrats won't take it, and we'll go over that proverbial cliff at the end of february. what's going to end up happening, i think, is that there's going to be incredible quick economic impact because of it. and that might persuade congress to go back and look at it and try to put in some sort of replacement. keep in mind, we just had a report a week ago that said that the economy shrunk in the fourth quarter in preparation for the sequester. not because the sequester hit, but in preparation for the sequester. so if that's just in preparation, i can't imagine what's going to happen when we actually do go through all the planning of going through sequestration. >> this is the worst on both levels. in the short run, it tends to be recessionary, if you will, it slows down an already slow economy. also by not discriminating between investment and spending, it really is the worst possible way to run this business calle
consensus to keep kicking the can down the road. i think the debt ceiling went like groundhog day. it's like this time we're going to have this debate. then at midnight on new year's eve we pass a bill and give senators six minutes to reid it before it goes and we've now avoided the fiscal by kicking the can down the road which now we passed a bill to push off until may the reckoning for the debt ceiling. nobody has come to the table to try to fix things. i say the senate hasn't actually passed a budget. the president and democrats haven't passed a budget in four years. there is a fundamental inability for congress to do their job. you are supposed to pass a budget by april 15. you are supposed to reconcile all those bills by october. that hasn't happened in four years. instead we've had this crisis atmosphere where things are passed in the middle of the night and nothing gets done. >> we only look at law makers records as they pertain to gun related issues. the numbers in the house and numbers of the senate haven't changed so much from the previous congress but there are faces that haven't
of default. >> whited lawmakers decided his best to delay the debt ceiling? >> about two weeks ago they tried in 2011 to use the debt and then as a leverage point to force obama to swallow spending cuts. it worked, but it is terribly damaging to the nation's economy and their political capital. with something like 90% in august of 2011 and they recognize this is a bad idea. thing is a pretty bad idea of a downgrade for the first time. they didn't want to do that again, but they didn't want to vote for a thicker national debt either. that doesn't care what their philosophy to pick them up with a strategy and in the meantime we want the senate to pass a budget for 2014 and the law says if either chamber fails a budget, paychecks will be docked. the whole idea is to postpone the economy default situation until the prosecutor at the continuing fight over taxes and then made to a point where both sides are satisfied in the debt limit can be raised again. >> how a template of a increasing the deficit in effect the economy and financial markets? >> where do you know the answer. it's sort of jan at t
the other. the debt ceiling or the sequester or the sgr cliff. does congressional staffers, i'm sure debbie can attest to, we are constantly living in his temporary environment because we have to. that is unfortunate your we would all like to take some time and do a deep dive into deep policy thinking and try to think of transformational ideas that can transform everything, but when we kind of walking to work reality hits us. we have a job to do. we have to take of the thing that is the most pressing on the front end, and, unfortunately, that's kind of the environment we are living in. and it was a very interesting panel, especially the last one, where i was hearing, there's nothing better than congressional staffers. actually talk to patients are going through the clinic. one of the things that, the reality that we suffer with, unfortunately and this is something we all have to deal with come is just the fiscal reality. as you rightly pointed out, it is right now the debate is about budget and at, people are can't figure out to control costs but also how to find actual savings that are sco
, and then the european credit crisis, as well as d.c.'s own fight over the debt ceiling. and then we were set to take off, all of a sudden we saw a big tumble in the stock markets and we saw job growth go back down again. i believe in august 2011 the initial report was zero net jobs. now they eventually revised that up to 100,000, but still an amemic growth rate. host: we continue our conversation regarding the 157,000 jobs added in january in the unemployment rate back now at 7.9% with patrick rice of politico. donald from statesville, north carolina is our next caller. donald is on our line for republicans. caller: hey, how you doing. i'm calling from statesville, north carolina, and we got some bad news here. freight liner who was in cleveland, north carolina, is going to lay off 750 employees. trim systems that supported them, they're closing their plant, 65 employees down to two. but here's my question, you know. when they do these job numbers, lowe's down here is going to hire 45,000 part time workers. does that count in the job numbers? or those are not even included? host: sorry about that donald
by raising the debt ceiling and that is no way to govern the country. i am hopeful that new labels will give us a way to govern the country where we start out at least bleeding in trusting the other members across the aisle have come to congress for the same reason we have. >> what can you do to bring about a more thoughtful, pragmatic congress? i want to throw out three ideas that are beyond the scope of what knolls febles has taken on. -- no labels has taken on. it was not perfect. we have 150 saved seats. they fear their primary. number two, money. and sentence. the creation of money is one of the threats to democracy. where incentivize to do crazy things. i give two examples last night. when the season the outrageous on the floor, when a republican member calls the president a liar, when a democratic member says the republican health care program is don't get sick and if you die, die quickly. those statements damage the fabric of our democracy and they raised $1 million in 24 hours. we can do about -- something about those first two. number three is the media. i am old enough to remember
on the fiscal cliff, pushed back the debt ceiling issue so that they can breathe a little bit and try and move away from just these fiscal issues. now on the horizon there are lots of house republicans, particularly younger ones, who say let's cut the defense budget, let those automatic spending cuts take place, and there are lots of senior republicans who say, not so fast. so that's going to be a problem within the republican party as we look ahead. >> where does karl rove and his new super pac fit into that? >> did you ever think republicans would call him a rhino, republican in name only. here you go. i've always thought of karl rove as a conservative. what's going on is his pac has said, you know what, we are tired of someone associated with his pac said to me, quote, the novelty of losing elections has worn off, and what they've decided to do is to start putting their money in primaries. they want to vet republican primary candidates so that by the time they get to the general election they believe they have qualified vetted candidates who can actually win. conservatives are saying, this
that we were holding back growth, if we got past the fiscal cliff and solved the debt ceiling which we did we would unleash all of this economic activity in the first quarter. it happened already. it happened in the third quarter. happened in the fourth quarter. and we know now that gdp for all of 2012 as it stands now, 1.5%, not very good. we didn't help anything back to have a burst of activity coming forward which is why i think economists still project the first quarter another sub par quarter around 1.5. >> you're saying the phenomenon they're talking about as uncertainty was more of a tax issue only pulling the money forward to pay the lower tax rate. second issue, ghost busters. no. second issue is rotation. this is the number one topic. and what says jim bianco on the rotation conventional wisdom? >> you just hinted it. it was all about taxes in late december. everybody pulls forward. bonuses, distributions, 401(k), whatever, paid in late december. yes a lot of money went into stocks. more money went into bonds. even more money went into money market funds. everybody got money in j
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